Care of the canine and feline neonate: part 1 (Proceedings) - Veterinary Healthcare
  • SEARCH:

ADVERTISEMENT

Care of the canine and feline neonate: part 1 (Proceedings)


CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS


Puppies and kittens are generally considered to be neonates from birth to two weeks of age although some references consider the neonate period to extend to four weeks of age. Neonates pose special problems in husbandry and health care due to their small size and developing organ systems. The overall mortality rate reported for puppies and kittens in the first few weeks of life is 30%. Recognizing the disorders associated with neonates and becoming familiar with their specific needs can significantly improve the neonate's chances for survival.

In humans the positive effect that quality prenatal care and support of the nursing mother has on the newborn's health has been recognized for many years. These factors are no less important in the dog and cat in producing healthy offspring. If possible, the veterinarian should be involved early in the breeding process, helping the pet owner develop and carry out a health maintenance plan for the bitch or queen and the stud dog or tom.

A health maintenance plan for the bitch and stud dog prior to breeding should ideally include the following:
     • Annual health check-up by a veterinarian, including a complete physical exam and minimum lab data base
     • Consider OFA and CERF certification prior to breeding, if indicated
     • Nutrition
     • Good quality, complete, and balanced commercially available diet appropriate for the current life stage
     • Maintain reasonable weight
     • Vaccinations
     • Core vaccines should be administered at intervals recommended by the veterinarian to maintain protection and satisfy legal requirements
     • DA2PPL- distemper, adenovirus 2, parainfluenza, parvovirus, Leptospira
     • Rabies
     • Vaccines should be given to the bitch and stud dog at least two weeks prior to breeding
     • Non-core vaccines may be given as the situation requires.
     • Bitch and stud dog should have Brucella negative status and be screened for other infectious disease as recommended by the veterinarian
     • Parasite control
     • Fecal samples should be checked annually for parasites and deworming carried out as
     • indicated
     • External parasite (fleas, ticks, mites) control should be practiced routinely in a manner
     • appropriatefor anticipated breeding circumstances
     • Perform heartworm testing and prevention as advised by theveterinarian
     • Runs or other housing areas should be properly maintained and disinfected
     • Appropriate drainage
     • Concrete surface ideal for runs
     • Feces should be removed on a regular basis
     • Disinfectants cannot work appropriately if feces, urine, or plant material
     • are not removed from the surface of the area to be disinfected.
     • Food should be properly maintained in an uncluttered rodent and insect-free environment.
     • Detailed health maintenance records should be kept.

A health maintenance plan for the queen and tom prior to breeding should ideally include the following:
     • Annual health check-up by a veterinarian, including a complete physical exam and a minimum lab data base.
     • Nutrition
     • Good quality, complete, and balanced commercially available diet appropriate for the current life stage
     • Maintain reasonable weight
     • Vaccinations
     • Core vaccines should be administered at intervals recommended by the veterinarian to maintain protection and satisfy legal requirements
     • FVR-CP- feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia
     • Rabies
     • Vaccines should be given to the queen and tom at least two weeks prior to breeding
     • Non-core vaccines may be given as the situation requires.
     • Queen and tom should be FeLV and FIV negative and screened for other infectious diseases as recommended by the veterinarian
     • Parasite control
     • Fecal samples should be checked annually for parasites and deworming carried out as
     • indicated
     • b. External parasite (fleas, ticks, mites) control should be practiced routinely in a
     • manner appropriate for anticipated breeding circumstances
     • c. Perform heartworm testing and prevention as advised by the veterinarian
     • Housing areas should be properly maintained and disinfected
     • Disinfectants cannot work appropriately if feces, urine, or plant material are not removed from the surface of the area to be disinfected
     • Litter pans should be emptied, washed and disinfected regularly
     • Food should be properly maintained in an uncluttered rodent and insect-free environment.
     • Detailed health maintenance records should be kept.


ADVERTISEMENT

Source: CVC IN SAN DIEGO PROCEEDINGS,
Click here