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Feline dermatology (Proceedings)

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Apr 01, 2010

There is more to know than Depomedrol!!!

Feline Integument

1. Unique Skin-Thinnest skin of all domestic animals.
2. Primary and secondary hairs ratio (1:10-24).
3. pH-5.6-7.4.

Eosinophilic Granuloma Complex

Group of inflammatory lesions affecting skin, mucocutaneous junctions and oral cavity of cats, usually due to genetic, parasitic, allergic, foreign body, viral and/or bacterial causes.
     It is a syndrome, not a diagnosis.
     Three variants of eosinophilic granuloma complex:
          1. Indolent ulcer
          2. Eosinophilic plaque
          3. Eosinophilic granuloma

     Indolent Ulcer
     Ulcerated lesion of upper lip.
     Alopecia, raised border.
     Blood and tissue eosinophilia is rare.

     Eosinophilc Plaque
     Moist alopecic papules and plaques.
     Usually abdomen but maybe on neck.
     Severe pruritus is usally associated.
     Blood and tissue eosinophilia.

     Eosinophilic Granuloma
     Pink to yellow raised plaque which maybe linear.
     Usually on caudal thigh of young cats.
     Nonpruritic.
     Younger and female cats predisposed.
     Focal collagen degeneration.
     Chin edema

EGC Pathogensesis

Genetic.
Allergic.
This is most common underlying cause.
Atopy, food allergy, mosquitoes.
Parasitic.
Bacterial.
Foreign body.

     Diagnosis
Clinical signs
     Histopathology
     Cytology

     EGC Treatment
     Depomedrol: every 2- weeks for 3 treatments.
     Antibiotics, especially Ditrim 120mg or Clavamox.
     Alpha-interferon 30-60 U PO/day, 7 days on, 7 days off.
     Intradermal allergy test- Allergy vaccine therapy.
     Oral Prednisone tapered to every other day.
     CO2 laser surgery.
     Antihistamines? Usually ineffective
     Cyclosporine therapy- 5mg/kg every day for 4-6 weeks, then every other day.
     Gold salt therapies.

Feline Acne

Alopecia, comedones, and follicular casts and crusts.
Rule out allergies, contact irritant reactions.

     Pathogenesis
Folliculitis.
Demodex, Dermatophytes, Malassezia, Staphylococcus
Keratinization defect.
Allergies.
Atopy, food intolerance, contact

     Diagnosis
Thorough history- include type of food/water bowls (avoid plastic
Cytology
Skin scrapings
Dermatopathology

     Acne Treatment
Cleansing
Antibiotics
Lymdyp?
Miconazole shampoos
Corticosteroids

Atopy

Seasonal to nonseasonal pruritus associated with elevated IgE.
Clinical signs include miliary dermatitis, alopecia, otitis externa, facial and cervical pruritus.
No age or breed predisposition.
Often misdiagnosed as Psychogenic alopecia??

     Diagnosis
Thorough history.
Skin scrapings.
Intradermal allergy tests:often difficult to read in the cat
Serologic allergy testing??-unreliable

     Treatment
Immunotherapy:75-80 have good to excellent response.
Antihistamines.
Chlorpheniramine 2-4 mg/bid
Claritin ?
Fatty acids.
GCC
Depomedrol?
Prednisone.