Lymphoma and beyond: Treating specific tumors (Proceedings)

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Lymphoma and beyond: Treating specific tumors (Proceedings)

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Aug 01, 2008


Overview
Treating specific types of cancer can be very rewarding. The goals of this session are to muster your enthusiasm, increase your knowledge and hone your skills for treating cancer in your patients. It takes a positive attitude and clinical courage to treat cancer aggressively for any pet. More skill and thoughtfulness are required to successfully treat and care for fragile and geriatric cancer patients. As importantly, it often takes just as much courage to realize that a certain patient has passed the window of benefit from known conventional therapies at hand. Cancer is both insidious and resilient. Cancer often wins the battle despite the best effort of veterinarians and pet owners. However, the journey and rewards of treating and caring for veterinary cancer patients are well worth the effort. When pets are past the window of therapeutic benefit, palliative and Pawspice care comes to the forefront. We can develop this aspect of practice into an expected and respected care program for patients with advanced cancer. We will discuss the treatment of general types of cancer; lymphomas, adenocarcinomas and sarcomas.

We will look at the most common treatment protocols for the most common types of cancer. As new information evolves, we must expect to change and improve our protocols constantly. We must be aware of and be willing to incorporate innovative drugs, biotechnology and supportive supplements into our existing protocols.

Furthermore, we must be willing to adapt "mainstream" therapies to individual client and patient needs, even if that means we enter some "uncharted territory" with some innovative yet logical adaptations of known therapies. The most important objective must always be to provide the greatest benefit for the patient while respecting the emotional, financial, and physical capabilities of the patient's caregivers. This ultimate consideration will provide the best quality of medicine for the individual patient and client situation.

It should be no surprise that no two oncologists treat their cancer patients the very same way or with the same bedside manner. This explains why your clients will get different opinions and impressions from different consultants. Therefore, this paper will share the author's personal perspectives and approaches. Following a protocol assists you in "how to" treat a specific cancer. Rather than giving protocols, this author would like show "a way to" approach cancer in veterinary patients. Be advised that when you practice oncology, it is to prolong the human-animal bond with quality of life. Hopefully, these pages will help you minister a greater number of your cancer patients into a longer and higher of quality life.

Furthermore, we must be willing to adapt "mainstream" therapies to individual client and patient needs, even if that means we enter some "uncharted territory" with some innovative yet logical adaptations of known therapies. The most important objective must always be to provide the greatest benefit for the patient while respecting the emotional, financial, and physical capabilities of the patient's caregivers. This ultimate consideration will provide the best quality of medicine for the individual patient and client situation.

In addition, there are no two oncologists who treat their geriatric cancer patients the very same way or with the same bedside manner. This explains why your clients will get different opinions and impressions from different consultants. The editors asked me to share my personal perspectives and approach with you and tell you the way I treat my patients. This is not a "how to" but rather "a way to" approach to cancer in geriatric patients. There is really no secret or mystery about what I have been doing for the past 35 years. Thousands of clients and my editors felt that it was my duty to share my decades of experience admixing oncology and the human-animal bond. Hopefully, these pages will help you minister a greater number of geriatric cancer patients into a longer and higher of quality life. I hope to make a positive impact and encourage you to develop and practice the art of geriatric veterinary oncology.